3 TIPS TO TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ

As a mother of two little boys, I have always known the importance of reading to them. I try to read to them as much as possible. My 2 year old is fascinated by books. He will beg me to read the same book over and over again. With my 6 year old, it is way more difficult to get him interest in any book that doesn’t come in a downloadable audio version unfortunately.

But as a parent, I know the importance of spending time reading to my children. I also know that every child is different. Some children can will take interest and learn quickly when learning to read and with other children it can be a struggle to get them to want to learn.

I wanted to share with you some tips that helped me teach my child how to read before entering school this year. I have also been using the same methods to start teaching my 2 year old. I didn’t want to wait too long as I did with my first boy in teaching him to read. It is better to start teaching them to read right now.

The biggest lesson I learned is to be consistent and utilize the right resources because every teacher needs resources to teach their students. As a parent, we need to make sure we do all we can to make the process of helping our children be successful at reading easier.

> Click HERE for my #1 resource for teaching my child to read this summer!

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TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ TIP #1

Most of us start by teaching our kids the letters of the alphabet which is very good to do, but in order for our child to learn to read they need to learn the sound of each letter as well.

This has been scientifically proven. In one study, 58 preschool children were randomly assigned to receive instructions in letter names and sounds, letter sound only, or numbers (control group). The results of this study are consistent with past research results in that it found children receiving letter name and sound instruction were most likely to learn the sounds of letters whose names included cues to their sounds. [1]

A method I have been implementing are alphabet flash cards. Show your child a flashcard, practice the name of the letter, the sound, and have them trace over the letter with their finger.

For example:

“The letter A makes the /A/ (ah) sound.”

Then have your child say the /A/ sound while tracing the letter with his or her index finger.

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TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ TIP #2

Do NOT forget to teach your child the basics. As adults, we know in which direction to read. We know to start from top to bottom and left to right, but a child needs to be taught this.

One way I ensure that my child knows the basics is by following the words I am reading with my finger so they can see which direction I read while I read to them. This is the easy way to use this tip in my opinion.

TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ TIP #3

My third and final tip for teaching your child to read is to teach final consonant blends first. Teaching the final consonant blends will get your child rhyming and will help them learn even more words.

For example: “at” & “and”

  • pat
  • bat
  • mat
  • hat
  • cat
  • sat

 

  • sand
  • hand
  • land
  • grand
  • stand
  • brand

This can go on and on. Use this final tip, once your child has been working on letter sounds and recognition. They do not have to have them all mastered to start blending, but as close to mastering the letter sounds as possible to make it easier on you and your child.

Teaching my son how to read has had to be one of the most challenges things to teach him as his mom. It takes consistency, dedication, and a lot of time to teach your child to read on your own, but it will be well worth it. Plus, your child’s teacher will thank you for taking the time to sharpen up this extremely important life skill.

Hope these tips help you!

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT MY #1 RESOURCE FOR TEACHING MY TODDLER TO READ! A TWO YEAR OLD CAN BE TAUGHT TO READ WITH THIS STEP-BY-STEP PROGRAM!

-Jenn

Sources:
1. J Exp Child Psychol. 2010 Apr;105(4):324-44. Epub 2010 Jan 25.
Learning letter names and sounds: effects of instruction, letter type, and phonological processing skill.
Piasta SB, Wagner RK.
Preschool Language and Literacy Lab, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

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